LLMs in Ireland

LLM in IrelandThe Irish educational system has long been valued for its excellence and enjoyed an international reputation. During the Dark Ages, many scholars from Britain and mainland Europe travelled to Ireland to study in the famous monastery schools. In the 21st century the tradition continues to flourish with international students from all corners of the globe travelling to study in Ireland. Indeed, Ireland has much on offer for everyone.

Where to study your LLM in Ireland

The duration of the LLM program in Ireland ranges from 1-2 years depending on whether you opt to study full or part time. There are a range of universities that offer LLMs in Ireland with a broad range of specialisations. Some of the universities that offer a Master of Laws program in Ireland include University College Cork, Griffith College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Galway and Trinity College Dublin.

The specialisations offered at these universities include international law, international human rights, commercial law, EU law, public law, international business law, peace operations, humanitarian law and commercial law and law, technology and governance.

Entry requirements for a Master of Laws in Ireland

The entry requirement for an LLM program at an Irish university is generally a 2.2 (i.e. lower second) bachelors degree or international equivalent, with prescribed certificates in English skills if necessary. But these requirements may vary with the institution – and some law schools may require a 2.1. Before you set your heart on going to a particular institution, check its entry requirements to make sure you comply with it. It is also worth bearing in mind that other qualifications will be considered on an individual basis, however all qualifications must be from a recognised higher education institution.

Tuition fees and Living costs

The tuition fees ranges from €10,000 to €15,000 depending on the institution of your choice. Living expenses also vary according to the lifestyle and where you choose to live and study, but a student may wish to set aside a budget of €8,000-€10,000 for accommodation, food, books, laundry, social expenses and other personal expenses.

There is some possibility of obtaining financial aid or scholarships which are offered by individual institutions. Generally however, students are expected to have sufficient funds to finance their course and to satisfy the visa clearance officer regarding proof of funding. Seeking part time work may also be a potential option but you must comply with all terms and conditions of your entry visa which only permits international students to work for 20 hours a week. You may also bear in mind that the rigours of a master’s course may not leave sufficient time for working.

Visa requirements for international students in Ireland

If you are a citizen of an EU country no visa is required to study in Ireland. All international students however, are required to obtain a study visa to stay in Ireland. The visa requirements can differ depending on what country you’re from, so check with the Irish embassy in your home country.

Usually the documents required to obtain the study visa for Ireland are a confirmed acceptance letter from the university, proof of funding to support the degree, academic transcripts and medical insurance. To allow ample time to process your application for admission and subsequently the student visa, you should make your application for admission at least six months prior to the commencement of the session in which you wish to enrol.

LLM in IrelandWhat to do when you aren’t studying

Ireland is an island nation with a small population which offers natural beauty and beautiful landscapes. With lush countryside, natural reserves and sandy beaches there is much tourism in Ireland and one does not have to travel far to get away from the hustle and bustle of city life and enjoy nature.

At the same time there is exciting urban life in cities such as Dublin, which are of central importance to Irish economy. Dublin is dynamic, vibrant, colourful and diverse. Its nightlife is famous for its pubs and bars, as well as restaurants. There is much to do from visiting the Guinness Store House to Dublin Zoo, the city’s castle to the Dublin Museum of Writers, Ireland’s National Gallery, Botanical Gardens and National Leprechaun Museum.

Although it is actually part of the UK rather than Ireland, Northern Ireland – and Belfast in particular – is definitely worth a visit during your time of living in Ireland. Belfast has a history of political instability which is illustrated in murals around West Belfast known as “The Writing on the Walls”. It is now a thriving city with great nightlife and plenty to see of interest. In Northern Ireland, in the northeast coast explore the fourth greatest natural wonder in the United Kingdom, the Giant Causeway which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a National Nature Reserve. Some of the most popular tourist destinations in Ireland include the Honeycomb, The Wishing Chair, The Giant's Granny, Lord Antrim's Parlour, The King and his Nobles, The Keystone, The Chimney Pots, The Fan, The Punchbowl. A number of cultural events also take place such as Saint Patrick’s Day in Dublin and the National Ploughing Championship being the most famous. There are also a range of art galleries and museums which beautifully display Irish culture, heritage and traditions.

Useful links:

Master of Laws in Europe

Master of Laws in the UK

LLM Guide: Top 10 Reasons for doing an LLM

A-Z of Global Law Schools and Universities

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